Sand Dunes And Large Rocks Revealed By Camera 1
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Sand Dunes And Large Rocks Revealed By Camera 1

Image Not Available
Photograph

Sand Dunes And Large Rocks Revealed By Camera 1

July 23, 1976
Gelatin silver print
Image: 5.7 x 24.1 cm
Overall: 20.1 x 25.4 cm
Museum accession
2011.0100.0009
Inscriptions verso (applied label, typed): NATIONAL AERONATICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION/ VIKING NEWS CENTER/ PASADENA, CALIFORNIA/ (213) 354-6000/
PHOTO CAPTION/
Viking 1-65/ P-17428 (Sol 3)/ August 6, 1976/
Sand dunes and large rocks are revealed in this panorama picture of Mars, the first/ photograph taken by Viking l's Camera 1 on July 23. The horizon is approximately 3/ kilometers (2 miles) away. The left and right thirds of this picture are the same/ areas that were photographed on July 20 (Sol O) by Camera 2 and provide stereo/ coverage. The middle third reveals a part of the Martian surface not seen on the/ July 20 panorama. The late afternoon sun is high in the sky over the left side of/ the picture. The support struts of the S-band high-gain antenna extend to the top/ of the picture. The American flags are located on the two RTG (Radioisotope Therm-/oelectric Generator) wind screens. In the middle third of the picture, the rocky/ surface is covered by thick deposits of wind-blown material, forming numerous dunes./ At the center of the picture on the horizon are two low hills which may be part of/ the rim of a distant crater. Two very large rocks are visible in the middleground;/ the nearer one is 3 meters (10 feet) in diameter and is 8 meters (25 feet) from the/ spacecraft. A cloud layer is visible halfway between the horizon and the top of the/ picture. The meteorology boom is located right of center. Behind it, the "White/ Mesa" is visible, which could be seen on the far left side of the Sol O Camera 2/ panorama. In the near ground are numerous rocks about 10 cm (4 inches) across, with/ horseshoe-shaped scour marks on their upwind side and wind tails in their lee. The/ fine-grained material in front of them contains small pits formed by impact of/ material kicked out by the Lander spacecraft's rocket engines.
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